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This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

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Glossary


  • 420
    Made up by a group of Bay Area cannabis users in the sixties, 420 is a code or slang referring to marijuana. The term came about when the group would get together daily at 4:20pm to smoke weed, and has since become iconic in American cannabis culture. April 20 (4/20) is widely regarded by regular users as the unofficial pot smoking holiday.
  • 710
    Similar to "420," 710 is a code or slang relating to dabs & concentrates; the reason is because 710 upside down looks like the word "OIL." In recent years, July 10 (7/10) has been declared an unofficial dabbing holiday similar to 4/20.
  • BHO
    BHO (an abbreviation for Butane Hash Oil) is a popular and flavorful form of concentrate produced using a hydrocarbon extraction process. To be more specific, BHO is produced by running butane through plant material and purging the resulting concentrate of residual solvents.
  • Blunt
    A hollowed-out cigar which is then re-rolled with weed
  • Bong
    A device used for smoking marijuana. A bong is filled with water which cools the smoke as it passes through. Some have ice catchers which further cool the smoke. The bong was invented several thousand years ago in the middle east for smoking of tobacco, but has since become a popular method of smoking marijuana. A bong is the preferred method if smoking marijuana for many people because it drives the smoke deeper into the user's lungs faster, thus exposing more of the mucus membranes to smokes, thus getting the user much higher using less marijuana.
  • Bubbler
    A handheld pipe (normally made of blown glass) that has a water reservoir at the bottom, which helps to cool the smoke and makes for a smoother hit than a dry pipe. Bubblers are the middle ground between a traditional pipe and the larger, less travel-friendly bong.
  • Buds
    Also called flower, "buds" are the smokable part of the cannabis plant.
  • Budtender
    Like a bartender, except for weed. This is the person who works the counter at your local shop, whose job it is to offer suggestions, inform, answer questions and showcase a shop’s products to customers. This word was added to the Oxford English dictionary in 2014.
  • Cannabinoid
    Cannabinoids are the chemical compounds unique to cannabis that act upon the human body’s cannabinoid receptors, producing various effects including pain relief and other medically beneficial uses. Marijuana’s most well-known cannabanoid is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) due to the fact that it is the most abundant, and also because it produces the psychoactive effects (or the “high”) that drives the plant’s recreational use. However, there are over 85 known cannabinoids all with varying effects... THC is just ONE. Other examples include CBD, CBN, CBG, and THCV.
  • Cannabis
    The point of this entry should really be this: the word "Cannabis" is not slang at all. Instead it is the accepted botanical Genus name for the plant we know by so many other slang and colloquial terms: Hemp, Pot, Marijuana, Ganja, Weed, Mota, Herb, Chronic, Green, Dope, Flower, Bud etc. etc.
  • Caryophyllene
    Responsible for the spicy taste in black pepper, caryophyllene is an impressive terpene that is unique because it is also a “dietary cannabinoid” (foodstuff for plants that acts as a cannabinoid and binds to your CB2 receptors). Studied for its potential to reduce alcohol abuse, this terpene provides a great deal of therapeutic benefits despite a lack of detectible physical effects.
  • CBD
    Gaining popularity as the primary therapeutic cannabinoid for a variety of diseases, specifically autism as well as epilepsy and other nerve-related conditions, cannabidiol is generally the second-most common cannabinoid found in cannabis, after THC. It is becoming highly sought after despite being nearly bred out of modern cannabis in the hunt for the highest THC strains; many breeders now pride themselves on their CBD-to-THC ratios instead. Traditionally, hemp varieties have varying amounts of CBD but almost no THC.
  • CBN
    CBN’s most pronounced, characterizing attribute is its sedative effect. For those of you who rely on cannabis to resolve a night of tossing and turning, a little CBN would might do you some good. Unlike THC, CBN induces little to no psychoactive effects.
  • Clean Green Certified
    Clean Green Certified is the number one certifier nation-wide for cannabis cultivated using international sustainable and organic practices. Legally, marijuana cannot be called organic — no matter how environmentally friendly the cultivation practices used to grow it — because the term is federally regulated and the USDA does not recognize cannabis as a legitimate agricultural crop. Clean Green Certified was created in 2004 as a way to regulate legal cannabis-products that called themselves "organic." Consumers can rest assured when they buy a Clean Green Certified cannabis product that it has met all of the requirements of the rigorous program.
  • CO2
    CO2 oil is a cannabis concentrate, made using a supercritical CO2 extraction process. Supercritical CO2 is a fluid state of carbon dioxide held at or above the critical point of temperature and pressure, which can be used as a solvent in the cannabis extraction process.
  • Concentrate
    The word “concentrate” in the cannabis world refers to any product which refines flowers into something more clean and potent. This umbrella term includes any type of hash (water hash, pressed hash), dry sieve (kief), as well as any hash oils (BHO, CO2 oil, shatter, wax, etc.) and indicates that these products are a concentrated form of cannabis, carrying a much higher potency.
  • Cross
    A cross (referring to crossbreeding) is the result when two different plant strains are bred together. For example, Blue Dream is a cross between Blueberry and Haze strains.
  • Crumble
    Crumble is the same thing as an extract or concentrate; The word “concentrate” in the cannabis world refers to any product which refines flowers into something more clean and potent. This umbrella term includes any type of hash (water hash, pressed hash), dry sieve (kief), as well as any hash oils (BHO, CO2 oil, shatter, wax, etc.) and indicates that these products are a concentrated form of cannabis, carrying a much higher potency. The term "crumble" is typically used to describe concentrates that have a crumbly, "ear wax" like texture.
  • Cure/ Curing
    The curing process is a very important step in a well-grown cannabis plant’s life cycle. After being harvested, trimmed, and sufficiently dried, the plant’s flowers are then put into airtight containers which slows the drying, allowing for a more measured and gradual process, which helps to maximize the flavor and smoke quality. Similar to what you would see with cigars or even wine, the drying and aging process develops deeper flavors and mellows the smoke. Uncured or improperly cured flowers often taste and smell like hay, burn badly, and are harsh on the throat
  • Dab/ Dabbing
    A popular new means of consumption, dabbing refers to dropping concentrates onto a hot surface (banger, nail, skillet, etc.) and inhaling the resulting vapor through a “rig” (essentially a bubbler), which is usually made of glass and sends the vapor through water.
  • Dab Rig
    Not unlike a bubbler or a bong, a dab rig (or "rig") is a glass water pipe used for vaporizing concentrates. Whereas a bong features a female connector for attaching a glass bowl, a rig has a male connector for attaching titanium nails or quartz banger.
  • Decarboxylate
    The process of converting the acid form (also called “inactive”) cannabinoids such as THCA and CBDA is an essential part of the process if you wish to consume cannabis orally — or experience the psychoactive properties of THC in smoked or vaporized flower or concentrates. Decarboxylation occurs at around 240 degrees Fahrenheit, converting THCA and CBDA into THC and CBD, respectively. Though the acid forms of these cannbinoids have some medicinal benefits, normally decarboxylation is desired for maximum potency and effect in edibles, tinctures, and salves. Otherwise, load up a bowl or roll a joint with dried flower and light it up to decarb the traditional way.
  • Distillate
    Distillate is not for the new and inexperienced. Generally speaking, cannabis concentrates isolate or separate cannabinoids like THC and CBD to create a pure and refined final product that goes well into 60-80% THC content. More recently, there’s been a surge in distillate—a clean and clear concentrate product with up to 99% activated THC. Distillates use an extraction process called “short path distillation” that separates and refines molecules and contaminants to create a clean, almost clear concentrate. Other extraction methods don’t produce nearly the same purity level or variety of uses as this technique, making it highly regarded as a “top-shelf” concentrate.
  • Edible
    Any cannabis product which is consumed orally and digested is considered an edible. This is the best choice for those who want to enjoy the benefits of cannabis without having to smoke anything. Cannabis consumed orally lasts longer, so it is always best to consume a little bit at a time in order to allow the full effects to develop.
  • Extract
    Same as "Concentrate" The word “extract” in the cannabis world refers to any product which refines flowers into something more clean and potent. This umbrella term includes any type of hash (water hash, pressed hash), dry sieve (kief), as well as any hash oils (BHO, CO2 oil, shatter, wax, etc.) and indicates that these products are a concentrated form of cannabis, carrying a much higher potency.
  • Flower
    The term "flower" refers to the smokable part of the cannabis plant: the flower bud.
  • Hash
    Traditionally “hashish” refers to any collection of the resin glands (trichomes) of the cannabis plant. Collection of the trichomes is performed via a variety of methods (dry sieve, water extraction), and the resulting product can be pressed, sieved, or microplaned into different consistencies depending upon the desired use and smoking method. Traditional hash-making countries press their hash, which makes it burn longer
  • Humulene
    Humulene got its name because it is a predominant terpene in humulus lupus (better known as hops). Humulene has a "hoppy," woody, earthy aroma and can be useful for suppressing appetite.
  • Hybrid
    Though nearly all modern cannabis strains are hybridized in some form or another, this term most often refers to the in-between option which lies between the energetic, uppy sativa and the relaxing, sedative indica sides of the cannabis spectrum. Hybrids have varying effects ranging from sativa-dominant, to balanced, to indica-dominant.
  • I-502
    Initiative 502 was put to the voters to decide whether recreational and medical marijuana sales would be legally allowed and regulated in the state of Washington. Voters said yes, and now we're here! The law creates three separate tiers: marijuana producer, marijuana processor, and marijuana retailer. Specific license requirements are detailed in the multitude of rules. The best way to keep up to date on the process is to register for email notifications on the WSLCB website lcb.wa.gov
  • Ice Wax
    Ice wax, for all intents and purposes, is essentially the same thing as bubble hash; it’s a dabbable, solventless concentrate produced using only plant matter and cold water. The major difference between bubble hash and ice wax is that bubble hash uses trim, but ice wax utilizes fresh, frozen plant material (like the “live resin” process) for maximum potency and flavor.
  • Indica
    In the retail setting, "indica" is used to refer to a strain whose effects are especially relaxing and/or sedative. For most consumers, indica is preferable for evening use. Remember it as "indica will put you in-da-couch." Growers typically refer to short and bushy plants with wide leaves as "indica" (regardless of its effect), while cannabinoid researchers want to do away with the terms "indica" and "sativa" altogether and keep the focus on the various terpenes responsible for the effects of different strains (which, as of now, comes with a steep education curve). At this point, those of us who work in retail acknowledge and respect the scientific perspective, but from a marketing perspective, it still makes sense to use the terms as descriptors like they're styles of beer (imagine asking a bartender about beer options, and they refused to use the words "lager," "stout," "pilsner," "IPA," etc... doesn't that sound frustrating?).
  • Kief
    A mechanical separation process which generally uses a variety of screens and agitation to separate the trichomes from the plant material, dry sieve hash is also traditionally known as “kief.” One of the oldest cannabis extraction processes, dry sieve can be traced back through centuries to the great Moroccan, Afghani, and Lebanese hash fields; traditional Lebanese blonde hash is in fact nothing more than pressed dry sieve. This method can be perfected to produce perhaps the highest-purity and most natural concentrate available (nothing but trichome heads), but generally, it is less pure than high-grade water hash or hash oils because it is more difficult to remove all of the plant matter. Quality dry sieve will generally test between 50 percent and 60 percent THC, but the ultra-pure examples can have higher content.
  • Kush
    In its most literal definition, "kush" refers to landrace indica strains which originally grew in the Hindu Kush mountain ranges between Pakistan and Afghanistan. More commonly, however, modern strains with the word "kush" in the name are likely derived from OG Kush (which is a misnomer because OG Kush is not a real kush).
  • Landrace
    The term "landrace" refers to the original, naturally-occurring strains of cannabis that grew all over the world. Landrace strains are most often named after their country of origin, such as Afghani (pure indica) and Columbian Gold (pure sativa). Decades ago, landrace strains were selectively bred together to produce more desirable effects and flavors (most notaby in Amsterdam, Netherlands), and those early hybrids such as Skunk #1, Haze, and Northern Lights have since been cross-bred to produce many of the hybrid strains we enjoy today.
  • Limonene
    Recognized by its sour, citrusy aroma, limonene is a naturally-occuring terpene found in fruit rinds. In addition to the citrus flavor, limonene is sought out for its mood enhancing effects.
  • Linalool
    Linalool is a common terpene in cannabis, although it's best known for giving lavender its distinct scent and flavor. It can be recognized by its sweet, floral scent. Linalool is also often used in aromatherapy as a sleep aid and a relaxant.
  • Microdosing
    Practitioners of microdosing are taking small amounts of cannabis in order to reap the medical benefits of THC while avoiding its psychoactive effects that can interfere with the demands of daily life.
  • Myrcene
    A chemical precursor to many other terpenes, myrcene is prevalent in most varieties of medical marijuana. Myrcene has an affect on the permeability of cell membranes, allowing more THC to reach brain cells and enhancing or buffering the effects of other cannabinoids and terpenes. Myrcene has a musky, herbal aroma and is sought out for its sedative and muscle relaxing qualities.
  • Nug
    A slang term for "flower" or "buds." A nug (short for "nugget") is the smokable part of the cannabis plant.
  • OG
    A commonly used qualifier for a large number of cannabis strains, "OG" in itself refers to OG Kush, which is a wildly popular sativa-dominant strain originally bred in California. In Southern California, OG Kush has become so popular that nearly every strain in their dispensaries is an OG cross or phenotype. In recent years, the common understanding is that OG stands for "ocean grown," though some are of the belief that it actually stands for "original genetics," or even "original gangsta." Though there are probably hundreds of OG strains at this point, the major commonalities you can expect are a dense bud structure and a pungent but pleasant flavor.
  • Phenotype
    In the retail setting, phenotype typically refers to a natural variation in effect for an already established strain. For example, White Widow is not typically known to be a strain that's high in CBD, but we regularly carry a phenotype of White Widow with a 1:1 ratio of THC to CBD.
  • Pinene
    Pinene is a terpene that is very common in cannabis strains. Have you ever noticed how you feel alert and and breathe easier when you walk through the forest? That's because of all the pinene in the air! As the name implies, alpha pinene (a-pinene) and beta-pinene (b-pinene) gives off a pine aroma, and— contrary to what one might expect from an active constituent in marijuana—can actually improve memory retention. Other effects of pinene include a boost of energy and mental focus.
  • Preroll
    A pre-rolled joint for your convenience. Quality can vary from full flower to shake, so ask before you buy. You get what you pay for.
  • Pull & Snap
    The texture of hash oil at which lies between a more runny oil and the shelf stable shatter at room temperature, a proper pull and snap is easily gripped by the dabber but pulls slightly before snapping off. The ambient temperature plays a huge part in oil’s texture, as more heat will make it more runny and sappy while cold will make it shatter
  • Resin
    Not to be confused with rosin, "resin" most often refers to the black, tar-like substance that accumulates in a pipe after repeated use.
  • Rick Simpson Oil (RSO)
    If you’re interested in medical marijuana, you’ll inevitably hear about a form of cannabis known as Rick Simpson Oil, or RSO. RSO is a concentrated form of cannabis oil that is thought to provide relief for a number of ailments.
  • Rosin
    Not to be confused with resin, "rosin" is a solventless concentrate that is producing using heat and pressure. Customers can safely make rosin at home using cannabis flower, parchment paper, and a hair straightener; commercial growers use hydraulic presses in order to produce rosin to scale.
  • Sativa
    In the retail setting, "sativa" is used to refer to a strain whose effects are especially uplifting, euphoric, and sometimes energizing. For most consumers, sativa is preferable for daytime use. Growers typically refer to tall and skinny plants with tin leaves as "sativa," while cannabinoid researchers want to do away with the terms "indica" and "sativa" altogether and keep the focus on the various terpenes responsible for the effects of different strains (which, as of now, comes with a steep education curve). At this point, those of us who work in retail acknowledge and respect the scientific perspective, but from a marketing perspective, it still makes sense to use the terms as descriptors like they're styles of beer (imagine asking a bartender about beer options, and they refused to use the words "lager," "stout," "pilsner," "IPA," etc... doesn't that sound frustrating?).
  • Shatter
    Shatter is the same thing as an extract or concentrate; The word “concentrate” in the cannabis world refers to any product which refines flowers into something more clean and potent. This umbrella term includes any type of hash (water hash, pressed hash), dry sieve (kief), as well as any hash oils (BHO, CO2 oil, shatter, wax, etc.) and indicates that these products are a concentrated form of cannabis, carrying a much higher potency. The term "shatter" is typically used to describe concentrates with a brittle, glass-like consistency.
  • Solvent-free
    Not to be confused with "solventless," solvent-free extracts are concentrates that were produced using a solvent (like butane, CO2, or ethanol) but have since been fully purged of any residual solvents.
  • Solventless
    The term "solventless" refers to a cannabis concentrate or extract that was produced without any use of solvents. Common solvents used in extracts are butane, CO2, and ethanol; though these extraction techniques are highly regulated, facilitated by professionals, and generally regarded as safe, consumers wishing to avoid these solvents may opt for solventless extracts like rosin or ice wax.
  • Spliff
    In the United States, a spliff refers to a blend of tobacco and cannabis in cigarette form. In Europe and Jamaica, a spliff is a big fat joint (no tobacco).
  • Strain
    A strain is a specific variety of cannabis. Strains are developed to produce distinct desired traits in the plant and are usually named by their breeders (or by creative consumers). Strain names often reflect the plant’s appearance, its promised buzz, or its place of origin... but sometimes the names are just weird, arbitrary, borderline offensive terms that the breeder thought would be amusing to black market clientele. Although the marijuana industry strives for consistency, strains can easily be mistakenly or purposely misidentified.
  • Tanker
    A syringe filled with concentrates (RSO, CO2, distillate, etc) for easy application. For clarification, tankers don't have a needle.
  • Terpenes ("Terps")
    Terpenes—colloquially referred to as "terps" by mainly dab enthusiasts— are phytomchemicals that naturally occur in all plants; they are responsible for a strain's unique flavor and effect. Common terpenes found in cannabis include myrcene (also found in mangoes), limonene (also found in citrus fruit), pinene (also found in pine trees), and linalool (also found in lavender).
  • THC
    THC is an abbreviation for tetrahydrocannabinol. It is the most well-known and most abundantly available cannabinoid in marijuana plants. THC is also the component in marijuana that is responsible for the psychoactive effects, or the “high.”
  • THCA
    THCA is an abbreviation for tetrahydrocannabinol acid. It is the non-psychoactive chemical precursor to THC and must be decarboxylated (heated) in order to be converted into THC. Washington state law mandates that all cannabis products include lab results for THCA in addition to THC, though for most products the THCA percentage is irrelevant (and frankly confusing) to consumers. When 0.877 is used as a multiplier to account for decarboxylation, the formula for converting THCA into Total Potential THC is as follows: THCA = (d9THC x 0.877).
  • Tincture
    A tincture is a liquid cannabis extract usually made with alcohol or glycerol that is often dosed with a dropper. Tinctures can be flavored and are usually placed under the tongue, where they are absorbed quickly. Effects can be felt within minutes. Tinctures can also be mixed into a drink, but in these cases effects will take longer because the tinctures will be absorbed by the digestive system.
  • Topical
    A topical is a type of cannabis product where the active properties of the flowers have been extracted and added to a product such as a lotion or a cream that’s applied to the skin. Absorbing cannabinoids transdermally does not make the user high, and topicals are typically used for therapeutic reasons.
  • Trichome
    Formerly referred to as "crystals" in the black market days, trichomes are the resin production glands of the cannabis plant. Though they are barely visible with the naked eye, trichomes often appear on buds as sparkly clear bulbs, somewhat reminiscent of lights on a Christmas tree. Under a scope, trichomes look like translucent protrusions with rounded heads (kind of like a mushroom). The trichome is where the majority of cannabinoids and terpenes are stored.
  • Vape Cartridge
    An increasingly popular and convenient means of consumption, a vape cartridge is a small, disposable, pre-filled tank of cannabis oil that can be attached to a battery unit to discreetly vaporize cannabis as one would an e-cigarette.
  • Vape Pen
    Typically customers use the term "vape pen" in reference to the battery units needed to use a vape cartridge. Alternatively, the term may also refer to an all-in-one form of vape cartridge which includes a disposable battery unit attached to it.
  • Vaporizer
    A vaporizer is an electronic device used to consume marijuana. It heats either flower or marijuana-infused oil at a lower temperature that produces a cannabinoid-laced vapor to inhale. You can actually "taste" your weed this way. There is no smoke to ingest, but this method still produces near instant effects. With new, more compact models on the market, vaporizing is growing in popularity.
  • Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (WSLCB)
    Formerly known as the Washington State Liquor Control Board, WSLCB (often referred to as "the LCB"), is the governing body which oversees the responsible regulation of cannabis products in Washington State. In addition to proposing rules and providing compliance guidance to cannabis business owners, some of their responsibilities include on-site compliance audits and manually approving the packaging designs for all infused products (edibles).
  • Wax
    Wax is the same thing as an extract or concentrate; The word “concentrate” in the cannabis world refers to any product which refines flowers into something more clean and potent. This umbrella term includes any type of hash (water hash, pressed hash), dry sieve (kief), as well as any hash oils (BHO, CO2 oil, shatter, wax, etc.) and indicates that these products are a concentrated form of cannabis, carrying a much higher potency. The term "wax" is typically used to describe concentrates with a waxy or dough-like consistency.